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STRONTIUM

STRONTIUM Suppliers list
Company Name: Mainchem Co., Ltd.
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Products Intro: Product Name:STRONTIUM
CAS:7440-24-6
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Products Intro: Product Name:Strontium pieces, dendritic (99.9%)
CAS:7440-24-6
Purity:(99.9%) Package:25g
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Products Intro: Product Name:StrontiuM
CAS:7440-24-6
Purity:99%, pieces Remarks:AAM124156
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Products Intro: Product Name:STRONTIUM
CAS:7440-24-6
Purity:99% HPLC Package:1Mg ; 5Mg;10Mg ;100Mg;250Mg ;500Mg ;1g;2.5g ;5g ;10g
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Products Intro: Product Name:StrontiuM, distilled dendritic pieces, 99.8% (Metals basis)
CAS:7440-24-6
Package:5g Remarks:042929
STRONTIUM Basic information
History Uses Production Hazard
Product Name:STRONTIUM
Synonyms:Strontiumpiecespackedinmineraloil;STRONTIUM, GRANULES, 99%;STRONTIUM, DISTILLED, DENDRITIC PIECES, 99.9%;STRONTIUM, DISTILLED, DENDRITIC PIECES, 99+%;STRONTIUM, DENDRITIC PIECES, 99.99%;STRONTIUM LUMPS 99%;STRONTIUM, RANDOM PIECES, 99%;granules,19mm(0.76in)&down(metalsbasis)
CAS:7440-24-6
MF:Sr
MW:87.62
EINECS:231-133-4
Product Categories:Inorganic Chemicals;Inorganics;Alkali MetalsMetal and Ceramic Science;Metals;Reduction;Strontium;Synthetic Reagents;AA Standard SolutionsSpectroscopy;AAS;Reference/Calibration Standards;S;Single SolutionAlphabetic;SN - SZ;Standard Solutions;metal or element
Mol File:7440-24-6.mol
STRONTIUM Structure
STRONTIUM Chemical Properties
Melting point 757 °C(lit.)
Boiling point 1384 °C(lit.)
density 2.6 g/mL at 25 °C(lit.)
storage temp. 2-8°C
solubility H2O: soluble
form random pieces
color White to pale yellow
resistivity23 μΩ-cm, 20°C
Water Solubility reacts quickly with H2O; soluble alcohol [HAW93]
Sensitive Air & Moisture Sensitive
Merck 13,8915
CAS DataBase Reference7440-24-6(CAS DataBase Reference)
Safety Information
Hazard Codes F,Xi,T
Risk Statements 37/38-41-38-14-11-36/38-34-23/24/25-36-14/15
Safety Statements 26-45-36/37/39-27-23
RIDADR UN 3264 8/PG 3
WGK Germany 3
RTECS WK8400000
TSCA Yes
HazardClass 4.3
PackingGroup II
MSDS Information
ProviderLanguage
SigmaAldrich English
ACROS English
ALFA English
STRONTIUM Usage And Synthesis
HistoryWilliam Cruickshank in 1787 and Adair Crawford in 1790 independently detected strontium in the mineral strontianite, small quantities of which are associated with calcium and barium minerals. They determined that the strontianite was an entirely new mineral and was different from baryta and other barium minerals known at the time. In 1808, Sir Humphry Davy isolated strontium by electrolysis of a mixture of moist strontium hydroxide or chloride with mercuric oxide, using a mercury cathode. The element was named after the town Strontian in Scotland where the mineral strontianite was found.
UsesStrontium is found in small quantities in many rocks and soils, mostly associated with calcium and barium. Its abundance in the earth’s crust is about 370 mg/kg, about the same as barium. The average concentration of this metal in sea water is about 7.9 mg/L.
The two principal strontium minerals are its carbonate, strontianite, SrCO3, and the more abundant sulfate mineral celestite, SrSO4.
Elemental strontium has only minor uses, since most applications involve calcium and barium. Strontium alloys are used as “getters” for vacuum tubes. It is incorporated in glass for making picture tubes for color television. Strontium compounds are used in tracer bullets and in fireworks to produce red signal flares. Strontium titanate is a gemstone. The radioactive strontium- 90 with a half-life of 29 years is a high-energy beta emitter. It is a product of nuclear fission. This isotope is a lightweight nuclear-electric power source in space vehicles and remote weather stations.
ProductionStrontium and its compounds are mostly derived from celestite, SrSO4. The mineral is converted to its carbonate by heating with sodium carbonate. Alternatively, the mineral may be reduced to sulfide by heating with coke. The carbonate or the sulfide is then converted to other strontium salts.
Metallic strontium is produced by electrolysis of a mixed melt of strontium chloride and potassium chloride in a graphite crucible using an iron rod as cathode. The upper cathodic space is cooled and the strontium metal collects over the cooled cathode and forms a stick.
Strontium metal also can be prepared by thermal reduction of its oxide with aluminum. Strontium oxide-aluminum mixture is heated at high temperature in vacuum. Strontium is collected by distillation in vacuum. Strontium also is obtained by reduction of its amalgam, hydride, and other salts. The amalgam is heated and the mercury is separated by distillation. If hydride is used, it is heated at 1,000°C in vacuum for decomposition and removal of hydrogen. Such thermal reductions yield high–purity metal.
HazardThe finely-powdered metal is pyrophoric. Its radioactive isotopes Sr-89 and Sr-90 emit high-energy beta radiation. They are extremely hazardous because they deposit in bones replacing calcium. Their radiation can damage bone marrow and blood-forming organs, inducing cancer.
Chemical PropertiesPale-yellow, soft metal; chemically similar to calcium. Soluble in alcohol and acids, decomposes water on contact.
HistoryIsolated by Davey by electrolysis in 1808; however, Adair Crawford in 1790 recognized a new mineral (strontianite) as differing from other barium minerals (baryta). Strontium is found chiefly as celestite (SrSO4) and strontianite (SrCO3). Celestite is found in Mexico, Turkey, Iran, Spain, Algeria, and in the U.K. The U.S. has no active celestite mines. The metal can be prepared by electrolysis of the fused chloride mixed with potassium chloride, or is made by reducing strontium oxide with aluminum in a vacuum at a temperature at which strontium distills off. Three allotropic forms of the metal exist, with transition points at 235 and 540°C. Strontium is softer than calcium and decomposes water more vigorously. It does not absorb nitrogen below 380°C. It should be kept under mineral oil to prevent oxidation. Freshly cut strontium has a silvery appearance, but rapidly turns a yellowish color with the formation of the oxide. The finely divided metal ignites spontaneously in air. Volatile strontium salts impart a beautiful crimson color to flames, and these salts are used in pyrotechnics and in the production of flares. Natural strontium is a mixture of four stable isotopes. Thirty-two other unstable isotopes and isomers are known to exist. Of greatest importance is 90Sr with a half-life of 29 years. It is a product of nuclear fallout and presents a health problem. This isotope is one of the best long-lived high-energy beta emitters known, and is used in SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) devices. These devices hold promise for use in space vehicles, remote weather stations, navigational buoys, etc., where a lightweight, long-lived, nuclear-electric power source is needed. The major use for strontium at present is in producing glass for color television picture tubes. All color TV and cathode ray tubes sold in the U.S. are required by law to contain strontium in the face plate glass to block X-ray emission. Strontium also improves the brilliance of the glass and the quality of the picture. It has also found use in producing ferrite magnets and in refining zinc. Strontium titanate is an interesting optical material as it has an extremely high refractive index and an optical dispersion greater than that of diamond. It has been used as a gemstone, but it is very soft. It does not occur naturally. Strontium metal (99% pure) costs about $220/kg.
UsesThis soft, yellowish, metallic element was isolated by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808. It was found in the minerals strontianite and celestine. The strontium halides were used in the making of collodion emulsions.
UsesIn fireworks, in red signal flares; on tracer bullets. Eutectic modifier in Al-Ag casting alloys to improve strength and ductility. Innoculant in ductile iron casting to control graphite formation.
DefinitionMetallic element of atomic number 38, group IIA of periodic table, aw 87.62, valence = 2, radioactive isotopes strontium-89 and strontium-90. There are four stable isotopes.
HazardSpontaneously flammable in powder form, igniteswhen heated above its mp. Reactswithwater to evolve hydrogen. Store under naphtha.
STRONTIUM Preparation Products And Raw materials
Preparation ProductsStrontium peroxide
Raw materialsStrontium nitrate -->STRONTIUM OXIDE
Tag:STRONTIUM(7440-24-6) Related Product Information
STRONTIUM LANTHANUM ALUMINATE,STRONTIUM LANTHANUM ALUMINUM OXIDE TANTALUM STRONTIUM METALLO-ORGANIC STANDARD STRONTIUM METHOXYPROPOXIDE STRONTIUM OXIDE,STRONTIUM OXIDE (MONO) STRONTIUM ION CHROMATOGRAPHY STANDARD STRONTIUM (II) SULFATE STRONTIUM MALONATE STRONTIUM PALMITATE STRONTIUM IODIDE Strontium fluoride STRONTIUM BROMIDE STRONTIUM NITRATE STRONTIUM (II) TITANATE STRONTIUM SUCCINATE Strontium chloride STRONTIUM SALICYLATE Strontium hydroxide