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Copper

Copper Suppliers list
Company Name: Shenzhen Sendi Biotechnology Co.Ltd.
Tel: 0755-23311925 18102838259
Email: Abel@chembj.com
Products Intro: Product Name:Copper
CAS:7440-50-8
Purity:99% Package:61/KG
Company Name: Mainchem Co., Ltd.
Tel: +86-0592-6210733
Email: sales@mainchem.com
Products Intro: Product Name:Copper
CAS:7440-50-8
Company Name: Sinopharm Chemical Reagent Co,Ltd.  Gold
Tel: 86-21-63210123
Email: sj_scrc@sinopharm.com
Products Intro: CAS:7440-50-8
Package:100Ml
Company Name: Shanghai bike new material technology co., LTD  Gold
Tel: 17317635738
Email: 17317635738@163.com
Products Intro: Product Name:Copper
CAS:7440-50-8
Purity:0.999 Package:10g;50g;100g;500g;1kg;5kg;25kg
Company Name: J & K SCIENTIFIC LTD.  
Tel: 400-666-7788 +86-10-82848833
Email: jkinfo@jkchemical.com;market6@jkchemical.com
Products Intro: Product Name:Copper wire cloth, 40 mesh
CAS:7440-50-8
Purity:(99.999+%) Package:900mm
Copper Chemical Properties
Melting point 1083.4 °C(lit.)
Boiling point 2580 °C
density 8.92
Fp -23 °C
storage temp. 2-8°C
form wire
color Rust-brownish
resistivity1.673 μΩ-cm, 20°C
Water Solubility insoluble
Sensitive air sensitive
Merck 13,2545
Stability:Stable. Incompatible with strong acids, active halogen compounds, chlorine, fluorine, iodine, bromine, ammonia. May react explosively with strong oxidizing agents.
InChIKeyRYGMFSIKBFXOCR-UHFFFAOYSA-N
CAS DataBase Reference7440-50-8(CAS DataBase Reference)
NIST Chemistry ReferenceCopper(7440-50-8)
EPA Substance Registry SystemCopper(7440-50-8)
Safety Information
Hazard Codes F,N,Xi,Xn
Risk Statements 17-36/38-11-52/53-67-65-62-51/53-48/20-38-53-50/53-50-68/20/21/22-20/21/22
Safety Statements 5-26-16-61-62-36/37-60-36
RIDADR UN 3089 4.1/PG 2
WGK Germany 3
RTECS GL5325000
10
TSCA Yes
HazardClass 4.1
PackingGroup III
HS Code 74081100
Hazardous Substances Data7440-50-8(Hazardous Substances Data)
MSDS Information
ProviderLanguage
ACROS English
SigmaAldrich English
ALFA English
Copper Usage And Synthesis
Chemical PropertiesReddish brown metal; face-centered cubic crystal; density 8.92 g/cm3; Mohs hardness 2.5 to 3.0; Brinnel hardness 43 (annealed); electrical resistivity 1.71 microhm-cm at 25°C; Poisson's ratio 0.33; melts at 1,083°C; vaporizes at 2,567°C; insoluble in water; dissolves in nitric acid and hot sulfuric acid; slightly soluble in hydrochloric acid; also soluble in ammonium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and potassium cyanide solutions.
Chemical PropertiesCopper is a reddish-brown metal which occurs free or in ores, such as malachite, cuprite, and chalcopyrite.
HistoryThe discovery of copper dates from prehistoric times. It is said to have been mined for more than 5000 years. It is one of man’s most important metals. Copper is reddish colored, takes on a bright metallic luster, and is malleable, ductile, and a good conductor of heat and electricity (second only to silver in electrical conductivity). The electrical industry is one of the greatest users of copper. Copper occasionally occurs native, and is found in many minerals such as cuprite, malachite, azurite, chalcopyrite, and bornite. Large copper ore deposits are found in the U.S., Chile, Zambia, Zaire, Peru, and Canada. The most important copper ores are the sulfides, oxides, and carbonates. From these, copper is obtained by smelting, leaching, and by electrolysis. Its alloys, brass and bronze, long used, are still very important; all American coins are now copper alloys; monel and gun metals also contain copper. The most important compounds are the oxide and the sulfate, blue vitriol; the latter has wide use as an agricultural poison and as an algicide in water purification. Copper compounds such as Fehling’s solution are widely used in analytical chemistry in tests for sugar. High-purity copper (99.999 + %) is readily available commercially. The price of commercial copper has fluctuated widely. The price of copper in December 2001 was about $1.50/kg. Natural copper contains two isotopes. Twenty-six other radioactive isotopes and isomers are known.
UsesCopper-based ingredients are often used as coloring agents in cosmetics. Copper itself is nontoxic, but soluble copper salts, notably copper sulfite, are skin irritants. In the body, copper combines with certain proteins to produce a variety of enzymes, which in turn serve as catalysts for different functions. For example, copper plays a role in the keratinization process. In normal skin, this catalytic action is completed in 8 to 12 hours, however more than three days may be required in cases of copper deficiency. Through such enzymatic activity, copper is involved in melanin production, as decreased pigmentation has been observed in cases of copper deficiency. Such enzyme-based action also links copper to maintaining and repairing the skin’s connective tissues (collagen and elastin), as well as to wound healing.
UsesCopper is a metal that occurs naturally throughout the environment, in rocks, soil, water, and air. Copper is an essential element in plants and animals (including humans), which means it is necessary for us to live. Therefore, plants and animals must absorb some copper from eating, drinking, and breathing.
The use of copper dates back to prehistoric times. The metal, its compounds, and alloys have numerous applications in every sphere of life–making it one of the most important metals. Practically all coinages in the world are made out of copper or its alloys. Its alloys, bronze and brass, date from ancient times. More modern alloys such as monel, gun metals, and berylliumcopper also have wide applications. The metal is an excellent conductor of electricity and heat and is used in electric wiring, switches and electrodes. Other applications are in plumbing, piping, roofing, cooking utensils, construction materials, and electroplated protective coatings. Its compounds, namely the oxides, sulfates, and chlorides, have numerous of commercial applications.
Copper is distributed widely in nature as sulfides, oxides, arsenides, arsenosulfides, and carbonates. It occurs in the minerals cuprite, chalcopyrite, azurite, chalcocite, malachite and bornite. Most copper minerals are sulfides or oxides. Native copper contains the metal in uncombined form.
UsesCopper is a metal necessary for the maintenance of normal erythro- poiesis and the prevention of iron deficiency anemia, iron being essential in hemoglobin synthesis.
DefinitionMetallic element of atomic number 29, group IB of the periodic table, aw 63.546, valences 1, 2; two stable isotopes.
Usesmanufacture of bronzes, brass, other copper alloys, electrical conductors, ammunition, copper salts, works of art.
General DescriptionReddish lustrous malleable odorless metallic solid.
Air & Water ReactionsSolid pieces are very slowly oxidized by air to give a green basic carbonate. Solid pieces become covered by a black oxide when heated in air. Insoluble in water.
Reactivity ProfileCopper combines violently with chlorine trifluoride in the presence of carbon [Mellor 2, Supp. 1, 1956]. Is oxidized by sodium peroxide with incandescence [Mellor 2:490-93, 1946-1947]. Forms an unstable acetylide when acetylene is passed over samples that have been heated enough to form an oxide coating. Reacts more rapidly in powdered or granular form. Subject to explosive reaction then mixed in finely divided form with finely divided bromates chlorates and iodates of barium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, or zinc; these reactions are initiated by heat, percussion, and occasionally light friction [Mellor 2:310, 1946-1947]. A solution of sodium azide in Copper pipe with lead joints formed Copper azide and lead azide, both of these compounds can detonate [Klotz, 1973].
HazardFlammable in finely divided form. Gastrointestinal irritant and metal fume fever.
Health HazardOccupational workers exposed to copper fumes, dust and mists in work areas develop symptoms of poisoning. These include irritation to the mucous membrane, nasal, and pharyngeal irritation; nasal perforation, eye irritation, metallic or sweet taste, dermatitis; prolonged periods of exposure to high concentrations cause anemia, adverse effects to the lung, liver, and kidney. The exposed worker also suffers from metal fume fever; chills, muscle aches, nausea, fever, dry throat, coughing, weakness, lassitude, irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract, discolored skin and hair, and acute lung damage. Occupational workers exposed to copper dust suffer from gastrointestinal disturbances, headache, vertigo, drowsiness, and hepatomegaly. Vineyard workers chronically exposed to Bordeaux mixture (copper sulfate and lime) exhibit degenerative changes of the lungs and liver. Dermal exposure to copper may cause contact dermatitis in some individuals. Copper is required for collagen formation. Copper defi ciency is associated with atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular conditions. Any kind of imbalance of copper in the body causes health disorders that include, but are not limited to, arthritis, fatigue, adrenal burnout, insomnia, scoliosis, osteoporosis, heart disease, cancer, migraine headaches, seizures, gum disease, tooth decay, skin and hair problems, and uterine fi broids, endometriosis (in females). Copper defi ciency is associated with aneurysms, gout, anemia, and osteoporosis. Exposures to copper in the form of dusts and mists cause irritation to the eyes, respiratory system, mucous membrane, nasal, pharyngeal irritation cough, dyspnea (breathing diffi culty), and wheezing. Prolonged exposures are known to cause nasal perforation. Copper has caused anemia and damage to the lung, liver, and kidney in experimental laboratory animals. Reports have indicated that copper dusts and fumes are potential occupational carcinogens.
Safety ProfileToxic by inhalation. Questionable carcinogen with experimental tumorigenic data. Experimental teratogenic and reproductive effects. Human systemic effects by ingestion: nausea and vomiting. See also COPPER COMPOUNDS. Liquid copper explodes on contact with water. Potentially explosive reaction with acetylenic compounds, 3-bromopropyne, ethylene oxide, lead azide, and ammonium nitrate. Iptes on contact with chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine (above 121℃), and hydrazinium nitrate (above 70'). Reacts violently with C2H2, bromates, chlorates, iodates, (Cl2 + OF2), dimethyl sulfoxide + trichloroacetic acid, ethylene oxide, H202, hydrazine mononitrate, hydrazoic acid, H2S + air, Pb(N3)2, K2O2, NaN3, Na2O2, sulfuric acid. Incandescent reaction with potassium dioxide. Incompatible with 1 -bromo-2 propyne.
Potential ExposureExposure to fume may occur in copper and brass plants; and during the welding of copper alloys; Metallic copper is an excellent conductor of electricity and is widely used in the electrical industry in all gauges of wire for circuitry, coil, and armature windings; high conductivity tubes; commutator bars, etc. It is made into castings, sheets, rods, tubing, and wire and is used in water and gas piping; roofing materials; cooking utensils; chemical and pharmaceutical equipment and coinage. Copper forms many important alloys: Be-Cu alloy, brass, bronze; gunmetal, bell metal; German silver; aluminum bronze, silicon bronze; phosphor bronze; and manganese bronze. Copper compounds are used as insecticides, algicides, molluscicides, plant fungicides, mordants, pigments, catalysts; as a copper supplement for pastures; and in the manufacture of powdered bronze paint and percussion caps. They are also utilized in analytical reagents, in paints for ships’ bottoms; in electroplating; and in the solvent for cellulose in rayon manufacture.
First aidIf copper dust or powder gets into the eyes, remove any contact lenses at once and irrigate immediately for at least 15 minutes, occasionally lifting upper and lower lids. Seek medical attention immediately. If copper dusts or powder contacts the skin, remove contaminated clothing and wash immediately with soap and water. Seek medical attention immediately. If this chemical has been inhaled, remove from exposure, begin rescue breathing (using universal precautions, including resuscitation mask) if breathing has stopped and CPR if heart action has stopped. Transfer promptly to a medical facility. When this chemical has been swallowed, get medical attention. Give large quantities of water and induce vomiting. Do not make an unconscious person vomit.
ShippingUN3089 Metal powders, flammable, n.o.s., Hazard Class: 4.1; Labels: 4.1-Flammable solid. Copper, elemental is not specifically cited in DOT’s PerformanceOriented Packaging Standards.
IncompatibilitiesCopper dust, fume, and mists form shock-sensitive compounds with acetylene gas, acetylenic compounds, azides, and ethylene oxides. Incompatible with acids, chemically active metals, such as potassium; sodium, magnesium, zinc, zirconium, strong bases. Violent reaction, possibly explosive, if finely divided material come in contact with strong oxidizers
Waste DisposalCopper-containing wastes can be concentrated through the use of ion exchange, reverse osmosis, or evaporators to the point where copper can be electrolytically removed and sent to a reclaiming firm. If recovery is not feasible, the copper can be precipitated through the use of caustics and the sludge deposited in a chemical waste landfill. Copper-containing soluble wastes can be concentrated through the use of ion exchange, reverse osmosis, or evaporators to the point where copper can be electrolytically removed and sent to a reclaiming firm. If recovery is not feasible, the copper can be precipitated through the use of caustics and the sludge deposited in a chemical waste landfill
Tag:Copper(7440-50-8) Related Product Information
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