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N-BUTANE

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Products Intro: Product Name:N-BUTANE
CAS:106-97-8
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CAS:106-97-8
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Products Intro: Product Name:n-Butane
CAS:106-97-8
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Products Intro: Product Name:N-BUTANE
CAS:106-97-8
Purity:99% HPLC Package:25g,100g,500g
N-BUTANE Basic information
Overview Production Applications Warning and Risk References
Product Name:N-BUTANE
Synonyms:A-17;Bu-Gas;butane(liquefiedgas);butane(non-specificname);Butanen;Butani;butylhydride;Freon 600
CAS:106-97-8
MF:C4H10
MW:58.12
EINECS:203-448-7
Product Categories:refrigerants;Organics;Gas Cylinders;Hydrocarbons (Low Boiling point);Synthetic Organic Chemistry;Chemical Synthesis;Compressed and Liquefied Gases;Synthetic Reagents
Mol File:106-97-8.mol
N-BUTANE Structure
N-BUTANE Chemical Properties
Melting point −138 °C(lit.)
Boiling point −0.5 °C(lit.)
density 0.579 g/mL at 20 °C(lit.)
vapor density 2.11 (vs air)
refractive index 1.3326
Fp 45
form gas
Merck 1515
BRN 969129
Stability:Stable. Extremely flammable. Readily forms explosive mixtures with air. Note low flash point. Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents, strong acids, strong alkalies.
CAS DataBase Reference106-97-8(CAS DataBase Reference)
Safety Information
Hazard Codes F+,F,T
Risk Statements 12-46-45
Safety Statements 9-16-45-53
RIDADR UN 2037 2.1
WGK Germany -
RTECS EJ4200000
4.5-31
Hazard Note Extremely Flammable
HazardClass 2.1
MSDS Information
ProviderLanguage
SigmaAldrich English
N-BUTANE Usage And Synthesis
OverviewN-Butane [C4H10] is a colorless gas with a faint petroleum-like odor. The main sources of butane are the refinery of crude oil and the processing of natural gas. It is commonly blended into motor vehicle gasoline to increase the fuel’s volatility and to make engine starting easier. Butane contains mixtures of methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane and is a colourless aliphatic hydrocarbon gas with a gasoline-like odour. Butane is a component of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and as such is used in a wide variety of fuel applications for both recreational and leisure use, including heating and air conditioning, refrigeration, cooking, and lighters. Butane is commonly used alone or in mixtures as a propellant in aerosol consumer products, such as hairsprays, deodorants and antiperspirants, shaving creams, edible oil and dairy products, cleaners, pesticides, and coatings (e.g. automobile or household spray paint). Butane is used as a chemical intermediate in the production of maleic anhydride, ethylene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), synthetic rubber, and acetic acid and its by-products. Butane is a simple asphyxiant with explosive and flammable potential. It is also a widely used substance of abuse. The main target organs are in the CNS and cardiovascular system. Improper use and handling cause poisoning. Exposure to high levels of butane vapors can result in asphyxia. The symptoms of butane poisoning include but not limited to, rapid breathing and pulse rate, headache, dizziness, visual disturbances, mental confusion, incoordination, mood changes, muscular weakness, tremors, cyanosis, narcosis and numbness of the extremities, and unconsciousness leading to central nervous system injury.

Figure 1 Chemical structure of n-butane.
ProductionButane is extremely abundant in many parts of the world, being relatively inexpensive to produce and mine. It is a fossil fuel, which has been created over the course of millions of years by a complex process deep inside the earth from the remains of plants, animals, and numerous microorganisms[4]. Different types of machinery that require butane to operate seemed quite magical when they were developed long ago, but there really is little magic involved in butane production. Its production demands human ingenuity, hard work, repeatable production processes, and following safety procedures every step of the way[4]. General its production includes the following steps: removal of oil and condensate; remove the water; glycol dehydration.
Applicationsn-Butane can be used in the production of ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. It can also be used as a chemical feedstock for special chemicals in the solvent, rubber, and plastics industries, in the blending of gasoline or motor fuel, as a constituent in liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], and as an extraction solvent in deasphalting processes[5, 6].
N-Butane can be used for the manufacture of ethylene and butadiene, a key ingredient of synthetic rubber[7]. N-butane [R600] is a kind of ozone depletion neutral refrigerant, being a potential refrigerant for household appliances. N-butane has a slightly higher Ranking COP level compared to isobutane and a much higher COP than R134a of which the latter is still used in household appliances around the world[8].
Warning and RiskInhaling of butane can cause various central nerve system effects including drowsiness, narcosis, asphyxia, headache, cardiac arrhythmia and frostbite, which can result in instant death from Asphyxiation, Acute toxicity and ventricular fibrillation. Skin and eyes contact may cause burn or frostbite[9, 10]. Butane is the most commonly misused volatile solvent in the UK, and was the cause of 52% of solvent related deaths in 2000[9].
References
  1. http://www.thermopedia.com/content/607/
  2. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/butane#section=Top
  3. https://www.tceq.texas.gov/assets/public/implementation/tox/dsd/final/butanes.pdf
  4. https://butanesource.com/blog/79-how-butane-is-made
  5. https://www.tceq.texas.gov/assets/public/implementation/tox/dsd/final/butanes.pdf
  6. https://www.boconline.co.uk/en/products-and-supply/speciality-gas/pure-gases/n-butane/n-butane.html
  7. https://w3.siemens.com/mcms/sensor-systems/CaseStudies/CS_Butyl_Rubber_2013-01_en_Web.pdf
  8. https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2791&context=icec
  9. http://bennettgroup.ca/SDS/data/Gas%20Products/Butane%20-%20w221.pdf
  10. https://www.worldofmolecules.com/fuels/butane.htm
Chemical Propertiescolourless gas
Chemical PropertiesThe main sources of butane are crude oil refi ning and natural gas processing. It is usually blended into motor vehicle gasoline to increase the fuel’s volatility and to make engine starting easier. Butane contains mixtures of methane, ethane, propane, iso-butane, and n-butane and is a colorless aliphatic hydrocarbon gas with a gasoline-like odor. Butane is a component of liquefi ed petroleum gas (LPG) and as such is used in a wide variety of fuel applications for both recreational and leisure use, including heating and air-conditioning, refrigeration, cooking, and in lighters. Butane is commonly used alone or in mixtures as a propellant in aerosol consumer products, such as hair sprays, deodorants and antiperspirants, shaving creams, edible oil and dairy products, cleaners, pesticides and coatings (e.g., automobile or household spray paint). Butane is used as a chemical intermediate in the production of maleic anhydride, ethylene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), synthetic rubber, and acetic acid and its by-products. Butane is a simple asphyxiant with explosive and flammable potential. It is also widely used as a substance of abuse. The main target organs are in the central nervous and cardio vascular systems. Butane is found in aerosols, lighter fuel and refi lls, small blow torches, and camping stoves. Pure grades of butane are used in calibrating instruments and as a food additive. It is widely available. Misuse and adulteration of butane is a common com mercial practice.
UsesAs producer gas; raw material for motor fuels, in the manufacture of synthetic rubbers.
General DescriptionN-BUTANE is a colorless gas with a faint petroleum-like odor. For transportation N-BUTANE may be stenched. N-BUTANE is shipped as a liquefied gas under its vapor pressure. Contact with the liquid can cause frostbite. N-BUTANE is easily ignited. Its vapors are heavier than air. Any leak can be either liquid or vapor. Under prolonged exposure to fire or intense heat the containers may rupture violently and rocket. N-BUTANE is used as a fuel, an aerosol propellant, in cigarette lighters, and to make other chemicals.
Air & Water ReactionsHighly flammable.
Reactivity ProfileN-BUTANE can explode when exposed to flame or when mixed with (nickel carbonyl + oxygen). N-BUTANE can also react with oxidizers. Strong acids and alkalis should be avoided. .
HazardHighly flammable, dangerous fire and explosion risk. Explosive limits in air 1.9–8.5%. Narcotic in high concentration. Central nervous sys- tem impairment.
Health HazardHigh exposure produces drowsiness but no other evidence of systemic effect.
Health HazardExposures to butane cause excitation, blurred vision, slurred speech, nausea, vomiting, coughing, sneezing, and increased salivation. With increased periods of exposure to high concentrations of butane, the signs and symptoms of toxicity become more severe. For instance, the exposed worker demonstrates confusion, perceptual distortion, hallucina tions (ecstatic or terrifying), delusions, behavioral changes, tinnitus, and ataxia. Workers exposed to larger doses of butane suffer from nystagmus, dysarthria, tachycardia, central depression of the CNS, drowsiness, coma, and sudden death. It has been reported that poisoned individuals show anoxia, vagal inhibition of the heart, respiratory depression, cardiac arrhythmias, and trauma.
Fire HazardEXTREMELY FLAMMABLE. Will be easily ignited by heat, sparks or flames. Will form explosive mixtures with air. Vapors from liquefied gas are initially heavier than air and spread along ground. CAUTION: Hydrogen (UN1049), Deuterium (UN1957), Hydrogen, refrigerated liquid (UN1966) and Methane (UN1971) are lighter than air and will rise. Hydrogen and Deuterium fires are difficult to detect since they burn with an invisible flame. Use an alternate method of detection (thermal camera, broom handle, etc.) Vapors may travel to source of ignition and flash back. Cylinders exposed to fire may vent and release flammable gas through pressure relief devices. Containers may explode when heated. Ruptured cylinders may rocket.
Safety ProfileMildly toxic by inhalation. Causes drowsiness. An asphyxlant. Very dangerous fire hazard when exposed to heat, flame, or oxidizers. Highly explosive when exposed to flame, or when mixed with [Ni(CO)4 + O2]. To fight fire, stop flow of gas. When heated to decomposition it emits acrid smoke and fumes.
Purification MethodsDry by passing over anhydrous Mg(ClO4)2 and molecular sieves type 4A. Air is removed by prolonged and frequent degassing at -107o. [Beilstein 1 IV 236.]
Tag:N-BUTANE(106-97-8) Related Product Information
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